New eye drops may prevent vision loss after retinal vein occlusion: Study | Health News

New York: A team of researchers has now developed eye drops that could prevent vision loss after retinal vein occlusion, a major cause of blindness for millions of adults worldwide. A study, in mice, suggests that the experimental therapy, which targets a common cause of neurodegeneration and vascular leakage in the eye, could have broader therapeutic effects than existing drugs. The study was published in Nature Communications. Retinal vein occlusion occurs when a major vein that drains blood from the retina is blocked, usually due to a blood clot. As…

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National Doctor’s Day: Tackling mental health while treating people amid COVID-19 pandemic | Health News

New Delhi: After over three months of being in the crosshairs of the Covid-19 pandemic, the crisis has become a definite test for one`s mental health. Treating COVID-19 patients at proximity, watching the disease claim the lives of people – it only takes a second of thought to realise how much doctors around the globe have put their own life in jeopardy and how the situation can take a toll on their mental health.  However, to understand more about how the doctors are coping with the situation in detail, ANI…

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MRI scan used for heart disease could also pick out aggressive cancers, spot early signs: Study | Health News

London: A type of smart MRI scan used in people with heart disease could help assess whether children`s cancers are especially aggressive and spot early signs that targeted treatments are working, a new study suggests. Researchers showed that the MRI imaging technique, known as T1-mapping, could offer crucial insights into the biology of childhood cancers and give an early warning of how effective targeted treatments were likely to be.  T1 mapping scans measure how water molecules interact at a microscopic level inside cells to understand the cellular make-up of tissue and…

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Excessive sugar consumption linked with unhealthy fat deposits around heart, abdomen | Health News

Sophia Antipolis: Sugar consumption is linked with larger fat deposits around the heart and in the abdomen, which are risky for health, finds a new study. The study was published in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology. “When we consume too much sugar the excess is converted to fat and stored,” said study author Ms. So Yun Yi, a PhD student at the University of Minnesota School of Public Health.” This fat tissue located around the heart and in the abdomen releases…

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COVID-19: Indirect adverse effects likely on children, youth’s mental, physical health | Health News

Toronto: Despite reports that children and young people may be less likely to get infected with COVID-19 than older adults, there may be substantial indirect adverse effects of the disease on their physical and mental health, according to a new study, which was published in the CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).  “While children and young people seem rarely to be victims of severe COVID-19, we should anticipate that they will experience substantial indirect physical, social and mental health effects related to reduced access to health care and general pandemic control…

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Carboplatin-paclitaxel becomes better option for treatment of inoperable anal cancer: Study | Health News

Washington: A new study has suggested that people with inoperable anal cancer treated with carboplatin-paclitaxel had fewer complications and lived longer than those who received another chemotherapy that has been more often administered.  The results from an international trial, published by the Journal of Clinical Oncology, suggest that carboplatin-paclitaxel become the standard of care for anal cancer, a rare disease that accounts for less than 3 per cent of all gastrointestinal malignancies. The InterAAct trial compared carboplatin-paclitaxel with cisplatin plus 5-flourouracil (5FU). “The InterAAct trial identifies carboplatin-paclitaxel as the optimal…

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Key protein discovered in heart to reduce damage from attack, improve survival rates | Health News

Washington DC: In a heart attack, a series of biochemical processes leave the heart damaged, much like a car after an accident. There is loss of tissue that needs to be rebuilt, proteins that get crushed, muscle damage, and interruptions to blood and oxygen flow to the heart. Because the heart is not very good at repairing itself, it is important to discover ways to minimize damage in the first place. Researchers from San Diego State University`s Heart Institute discovered how one key protein in the heart can act as…

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Hepatitis C-positive livers safe for transplantation, patients cured afterward: Study | Health News

Ohio: Patients who received a transplanted liver infected with hepatitis C and were later treated for the infection performed as well in recovery as transplant patients who received an organ free of infection, says a new study. The study was conducted by researchers of the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine and UC Health and was published in the journal Liver Transplantation. Two sets of 32 patients were enrolled in groups: one group receiving livers for transplant from donors testing positive for hepatitis C (HCV) and a second receiving livers…

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Blood plasma from recovered COVID-19 patients safe for treatment: Study | Health News

Washington: A large study of 20,000 hospitalised COVID-19 patients who received transfusions of blood plasma from recovered people found the treatment was safe. The report, published in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings on Thursday, assessed the seven days following transfusion for hospitalised patients between April 3 and June 11 who were deemed at risk of progressing to a severe or life-threatening condition. Nearly 40 per cent of the patients were women; 20 per cent African Americans; 35 per cent Hispanic and 5 per cent Asian, the researchers said. Seven-day mortality…

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Mathematical models on severity of COVID-19 in India failed: IJMR | Health News

New Delhi: Various mathematical models on the severity of the COVID-19 pandemic in India carried a “strong element of bias and used assumptions” to predict cases and deaths, an editorial published in ICMR’s Indian Journal of Medical Research (IJMR) has said. It said it “is a huge risk” to solely rely on these models for policy decisions on advance planning since predicting infectious diseases for a new pathogen is an “extremely perilous proposition” and hence it should be avoided. The editorial ‘Lessons learnt during the first 100 days of COVID-19…

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AIIMS study observes Mild Behavioural Impairment as precursor of Dementia | Health News

New Delhi: Asia`s first-ever study on Mild Behavioural Impairment (MBI) by All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS) observed that MBI is a precursor to dementia. The finding stress upon the importance of assessing neuropsychological symptoms in patients without dementia. This study also establishes the relationship between MBI and diabetes for the first time. The study named `Behavioural issues in late life may be the precursor of dementia – A cross-sectional evidence from memory clinic of AIIMS, India` conducted by the Department of Geriatric medicine also stressed on multimorbidity, diabetes…

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COVID-19 may be transmitted with use of toilets: Study | Health News

Beijing: Flushing a toilet can create a large and widespread cloud of virus-containing aerosol droplets that last long enough to be breathed in by others, according to a simulation study that raises the possibility of COVID-19 being transmitted with the use of toilets. Researchers from Yangzhou University in China noted that recent studies show the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19 can survive in the human digestive tract and show up in faeces of the infected. Toilet flushing creates a great deal of turbulence, and qualitative evidence suggests this can spread…

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